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What the 2010 Census Tells Us

Jump in Hispanic population saves Illinois from population loss.

The tallies are in and Illinois, like the U.S., is growing, getting older and considerably more diverse, according to the decennial census.

From 2000 to 2010, Illinois’ Hispanic population grew at a rate five times faster than the state’s total population. Without this growth Illinois’ overall population would have decreased by a little more than 100,000 residents.

Ballooning by 15.8 percent or nearly half a million people over the last decade, Illinois’ Hispanic population climbed just over 2 million residents, expanding their presence in communities across the state.

In fact, Kendall County is one of five counties in the U.S. that saw the largest increase, more than tripling their Hispanic population since 2000. National statistics show Hispanic population growth accounting for more than half the country’s total population increase, expanding four times faster than the U.S. population as a whole. While local population numbers remain relatively small, Hispanic growth over the last 10 years is impressive. 

 

 

 

2010 Hispanic Population

*Township Figures

Number of New  Residents

Growth Rate as Percentage

Illinois

2,027,578

497,316

15.8

Geneva

1,329

626

89

Batavia

3,170

1,344

74

St. Charles*

4,623

2,160

114

Downers Grove*

9,952

4,019

68

Lisle*

8,895

2,790

46

Hinsdale

592

178

43

Clarendon Hills

426

246

136

Wheaton

2,617

594

29

Glen Ellyn

1,801

526

41

Elmhurst

2,898

1,181

69

Burr Ridge

430

126

41

Western Springs

362

149

70

La Grange

998

426

74

 

Growing and Getting Older

At a glance, the United States grew by 9.7 percent from 2000 to reach a total population of approximately 308.7 million people as of April. The average age of our population gained about 2 years, rising from 35.3 years in 2000 to 37 in 2010.  By comparison, Illinois’ growth was much slower than the country as whole, only widening by 3.3 percent over the last decade. As of this April, Illinois’ official population was about 12.8 million residents. Similarly to the nation, the median age of Illinois residents went up from 34.7 in 2000 to 36.6 in 2010. 

Illinois’ slower growth is exhibited in population losses for a majority of counties across the state, but Will, Kane, Kendall, Grundy and Boone counties expanded their populations by 25 percent or better; and McHenry, DuPage, Lake, Kankakee and DeKalb counties experienced growth as well, albeit at a more moderate pace.Here is the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2010 interactive map. You can click on any state to view more detailed demographic and population information.

 

 

2010 Population

2000 Population

Growth rate as %

Median Age

Cook

5,194,675

5,376,741

-3

35.3

DuPage

916,924

904.161

1

38.2

Kane

515,269

404,119

28

34.5

Of the 13 communities where Patch analyzed census results from 2000 and 2010, five saw a population decrease over that time period, with the rest seeing mostly nominal upticks. St. Charles Township experienced the largest influx of new residents, seeing its population swell by 21 percent. All communities saw an increase in the median age, thus getting older.

 

 

2010 Population

*Township

2000 Population

*Township

Growth Rate as Percentage

Median Age

Illinois

12,830,632

12,419,293

3

36.6

Geneva

26,552

23,268

14

41.7

Batavia

35,221

30,137

17

38.6

St. Charles*

50,854

42,051

21

39.5

Downers Grove*

146,795

148,110

-.08

42

Lisle*

116,268

117,604

-1

38.9

Hinsdale

16,816

17,349

-3

41.4

Clarendon Hills

8,427

7,610

11

39.6

Wheaton

52,894

55,416

-5

38.4

Glen Ellyn

27,450

26,999

2

40.3

Elmhurst

44,121

42,762

3

40.1

Burr Ridge

10,559

10,408

1

50

Western Springs

12,975

12,493

4

42.2

La Grange

15,550

15,608

-.03

40.4

 

Chicago’s Declining Population Means Political Consequences for Suburbs

Despite Illinois’ growth from 2000 to 2010, it did not keep pace with other states and, as a result, will lose one seat in the U.S. House of Representatives during the next election. Sent to Gov. Pat Quinn for his signature Tuesday, the new map was approved by the Senate and House along party lines. Chicago’s population loss of more than 200,000 people and Democrats' aim to win back seats in 2012 were the driving forces behind the new district boundaries, which must be drawn to ensure populations remain consistent. While politically motivated, Chicago’s massive population dip forces traditionally urban districts to stretch into the suburbs.  Republicans criticized the process, which is always bitterly partisan, and said the map could be challenged in federal court.

Barbra Fliege June 03, 2011 at 03:45 PM
Just out of curiousity, I wonder how accurate those numbers from the census are. I would imagine that people who are here under the radar are probably not reflected.
Julie Farrell June 03, 2011 at 05:01 PM
The cencus bureau did what they could to ensure those here illegally that INS wouldn't come knocking on their doors if they completed the cencus info. I don't know how successful they were in that endeavor, they're about as accurate as anyone can guess.

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